skyscript.co.uk
   

home articles forum events
glossary horary quiz consultations links more

Read this before using the forum
Register
FAQ
Search
View memberlist
View/edit your user profile
Log in to check your private messages
Log in
Recent additions:
Can assassinations be prevented? by Elsbeth Ebertin
translated by Jenn Zahrt PhD
A Guide to Interpreting The Great American Eclipse
by Wade Caves
The Astrology of Depression
by Judith Hill
Understanding the mean conjunctions of the Jupiter-Saturn cycle
by Benjamin Dykes
Understanding the zodiac: and why there really ARE 12 signs of the zodiac, not 13
by Deborah Houlding

Skyscript Astrology Forum

How Are the Houses Drawn?

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Forum Index -> Traditional (& Ancient) Techniques
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
MarkF



Joined: 22 Oct 2003
Posts: 523
Location: Outside Washington, DC

Posted: Sat Aug 21, 2004 4:19 am    Post subject: How Are the Houses Drawn? Reply with quote

I had a question about the different house systems, particularly how to picture them when I look up at the sky.

I just was curious just about Regiomontanus and Placidus because those are the two I use.

I know that Regiomontanus uses equal divisions of 30 degrees on the equator to delineate the houses, but where do they draw the lines to? If say you have 0 degrees of Aries on the horizon, then you go to the celestial equator on the horizon, add 30 degrees to it, and then what? Do you imagine a line that runs from that point on the equator up to the North Pole? And is the house cusp the point on the ecliptic where that line intersects it?

And I know that Placidus uses equal divisions of the path of the Sun across the sky for that day. Once you divided the diurnal path of the Sun into 6 sections, do you then draw an imaginary line that goes north-south until it hits the ecliptic?

I really wish I could see this drawn out, it would make is so much easier. Does anyone know a website that shows that?
_________________
Mark F
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Tom
Moderator


Joined: 11 Oct 2003
Posts: 3483
Location: New Jersey, USA

Posted: Sat Aug 21, 2004 2:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mark,

I don't know of a website, but there are a few books on the market, mostly out of print. Try astroamerica.com.

To answer your question regarding Regiomontanus The cusps are determined by six equal sized great circles that intersect at the north and south points of the horizon. The horizon is the "line" (circle really) that is perpendicular to the zenith. The zenith is the point that is equal to geographical latitude above the equator [the zenith is NOT the same as the MC].

The cusps of all quadrant systems are circles not lines. In Placidus the circles are based on time not space as they are in Regiomontanus.

Ihope this helps.

Tom
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Sue



Joined: 11 Oct 2003
Posts: 945
Location: Australia

Posted: Sun Aug 22, 2004 12:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mark,

If you haven't already done so, you might like to read the excerpt from Deb's book 'Houses' reproduced online. It really is one of the best explanations of the different house systems I've seen.

http://www.skyscript.co.uk/temples/9.html

Cheers
Sue
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
MarkF



Joined: 22 Oct 2003
Posts: 523
Location: Outside Washington, DC

Posted: Sun Aug 22, 2004 12:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I bought Deb's book last year and I loved it. I have read it over and over again. I think it nailed down the underlying reasoning behind the meanings of the houses in a way that makes it easier to apply to horary. It's from her book that I came to understand how a Regiomontanus chart is drawn up. But my conception of it is still tied to the words, and I can't quite picture what it looks like drawn out onto the real sky.

I wish I had a globe because I think it can be done on a globe, but it's hard on flat map.

This is not exactly an earth-shatteringly critical problem, but I always think its good for us to get away from the books, charts, and the computer to remember that it's all out there above us day or night. I've been always thought it was funny and kind of irritating to meet people who claim to know astrology but who will mistake Jupiter for Venus, and then act surprised when told that Venus can't appear overhead at midnight. And I am hardly better. I've never seen Mercury, not even once. Years ago there was a night when Mercury was supposed to be easily seen and I made the mistake of going up to the top of the Washington Monument under the mistaken impression that it would provide a good view. Wrong! I was blinded by the high power lights that are trained on it. Then there was the time I was attacked by an armadillo while looking at Haley's comet, but that's a whole other post.

For our European friends, here's what an armadillo is:

Armadillos
Nine-Banded Armadillo
Armadillo Central

They are not dangerous except when cornered.
_________________
Mark F
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Sue



Joined: 11 Oct 2003
Posts: 945
Location: Australia

Posted: Sun Aug 22, 2004 2:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I do know what you mean. It's one thing to read something in a book but another to really understand it on a practical level. Most of us are far more ignorant than we should be as astrologers of what is around us. I don't know if this will help but one nifty little program that is available online can plot all sorts of interesting things in the sky. It can be programmed so that you can watch the progression of the planets across the sky or see where something is at any given time or watch the Sun cross over the equator at the ecliptic back into the Northern Hemisphere on March 21st to mark the Aries ingress. Watching these things in animated form adds another persective. It even goes back to 6000BCE and ahead to 10,000CE. I've often spent hours playing around with it for no particular reason other than it is fun (and a fantastic work avoidance technique Very Happy ).

The link is

http://www.skyviewcafe.com/index.php

One thing I heard at a talk the other day that intrigued me is that, on Mars, Earth becomes the morning and evening star. It just reminded me of how we are only seeing the universe from one very small perspective.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
MarkF



Joined: 22 Oct 2003
Posts: 523
Location: Outside Washington, DC

Posted: Sun Aug 22, 2004 4:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

And how those NASA pictures of Mars show it to be a place that looks something like earth. They just released a great panorama the other day.

About the houses, I want to see what an intercepted house looks like, and get a feeling for why one house would span across several signs.
_________________
Mark F
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Pete



Joined: 29 Apr 2004
Posts: 301
Location: Kinnelon, New Jersey, USA

Posted: Thu Aug 26, 2004 10:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
For our European friends, here's what an armadillo is:

Armadillos
Nine-Banded Armadillo
Armadillo Central

They are not dangerous except when cornered.


Or if they think you prefer Halley's comet to them, apparently... Razz
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Forum Index -> Traditional (& Ancient) Techniques All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
. Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group

       
Contact Deborah Houlding  | terms and conditions  
All rights on all text and images reserved. Reproduction by any means is not permitted without the express
agreement of Deborah Houlding or in the case of articles by guest astrologers, the copyright owner indictated