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Primary Directions
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Martin Gansten
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Posted: Sat Aug 06, 2016 7:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

margherita wrote:
Al-Tabari directs the Solar Return Ascendant around the Zodiac over the year from birthday to birthday.

To be precise, the text uses equal degrees (= ecliptical longitude), but Ben thinks that ascensions give better results. Also, if I understand him correctly, Ben directs the Asc of the revolution, but I believe 'Umar at-Tabari meant the profected Asc, making his technique a continuous monthly profection (to complement his continuous yearly profection).
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Mjacob



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Posted: Sun Aug 21, 2016 6:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just a quick one but I am no genius at math. Eponymous Morinus software gives option for time including local apparent time. I seem to recall this in an issue to the man himself. When using the software offline I struggle to get it right when entering latitude and longitude of the place so I would appreciate any response but if it is simple to understand then gratitude
Matthew
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Martin Gansten
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Posted: Sun Aug 21, 2016 9:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm not entirely sure what it is you are asking, but you should choose the time setting corresponding to whatever system was used in noting down the birth time. For modern births this would normally be a time zone, so you choose Zone and then the correct offset from GMT (+ for eastern longitudes, - for western), and Daylight saving where applicable. In Morin's own day, birth times would typically have been noted using local apparent time (where 12 noon is the time of the sun being on the MC), but whatever system of notation is used is just a matter of convention: if the sun is on the MC, it's on the MC, whether we call that time 12 noon or 1:08 PM.
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pankajdubey



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Posted: Sun Aug 21, 2016 10:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mjacob wrote:
Just a quick one but I am no genius at math. Eponymous Morinus software gives option for time including local apparent time. I seem to recall this in an issue to the man himself. When using the software offline I struggle to get it right when entering latitude and longitude of the place so I would appreciate any response but if it is simple to understand then gratitude
Matthew



It is a question of Time and age of time-keeping: before 1750 or after introduction of Standard Time.

http://www.kepler.edu/home/index.php/articles/using-astrology/item/559-local-apparent-time

Quote:
The critical difference between local mean time and local apparent time is that the former keeps to a mean rate and the latter does not. The most obvious manifestation of this difference is that in local mean time reckoning, the clock usually has only an approximate relation to true noon, whereas by local apparent time reckoning, noon o'sun is always exactly noon o'clock. Local mean noon and local apparent noon coincide four times per year, yet local mean time severs the constant relationship between a clock and the Sun.


http://www.skyandtelescope.com/astronomy-resources/time-in-the-sky-and-the-amateur-astronomer/
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Mjacob



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Posted: Sun Aug 21, 2016 11:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you both - I set the software ages ago for the primary directions on an old computer that I have not used latelyand this is a feature where the default worked so I never noticed it before
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