skyscript.co.uk
   

home articles forum events
glossary horary quiz consultations links more

Read this before using the forum
Register
FAQ
Search
View memberlist
View/edit your user profile
Log in to check your private messages
Log in
Recent additions:
Can assassinations be prevented? by Elsbeth Ebertin
translated by Jenn Zahrt PhD
A Guide to Interpreting The Great American Eclipse
by Wade Caves
The Astrology of Depression
by Judith Hill
Understanding the mean conjunctions of the Jupiter-Saturn cycle
by Benjamin Dykes
Understanding the zodiac: and why there really ARE 12 signs of the zodiac, not 13
by Deborah Houlding

Skyscript Astrology Forum

Five Astrology books nearest your desk? (spot poll)
Goto page 1, 2, 3, 4  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Forum Index -> News, Notices, Books, Links
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Philip Graves



Joined: 07 Jan 2005
Posts: 436
Location: Europe

Posted: Sun Sep 12, 2010 9:37 pm    Post subject: Five Astrology books nearest your desk? (spot poll) Reply with quote

I hope this isn't too trivial for Skyscript, but thought it might be of some casual discursive interest to enquire as to which five publications connected with astrology might currently be on or nearest to the front of the desks of Skyscript members just now, and a little about them.

I think I'll volunteer to start off with (my reasons won't all be entirely satisfactory), so here is what is in fact closest to the front of my desk just now:

1. Lispenard, Bessie 'Astrological Basic Principles Book II' [Self-Published], Grand Central Station, New York, 1955. One of those mimeographed typescript curiosities typical of the underground astrological publishing industry from the 1950s to 1970s in the United States, that are always so fascinating to discover! This book has chapters dedicated to the discussion of the Moon's Nodes, the Part of Fortune, Aspects, Decanates, The Elements, and 100 Questions and Answers on Astrology. I don't have a copy of Book I, and there is none on the marketplace.

2. Bini, Daniele et al., eds. 'Liber Physiognomiae der Biblioteca Estense Universitaria in Modena' - Libri Illustri Il Bilino, 2000. This consists of a full-colour facsimile of an old slightly illustrated Latin manuscript, complete with a replica working volvelle diagram, paired with a modern printed edition with facing German translation of the same work, in a cardboard slipcase

3. Palingenius, M., tr. Googe, Barnaby 'The Zodiake of Life' Scholars' Facsimiles & Reprints, New York, N. Y., 1947. Consists of a monochrome facsimile of a very early English translation of the work, from 1576, together with an introduction and scans of a few variant forms of certain pages in the various Latin editions.

4. Stone, Ken 'Astrodynes: Astrological Power & Harmony' Libran Pub., Los Angeles, California, 1971. Should be self-explanatory to anyone familiar with the basic principles of cosmodynes / astrodynes, but I want to cross check this with Stone's work 'Delineation with Astrodynes', presently published by the A.F.A., to see if they are in fact the same text or completely different works. PS: I have now located my copy of 'Delineation with Astrodynes' and confirmed that the two books are completely different in their contents. The A.F.A. states that 'Delineation...' was first printed in 1972, which would make sense of it having been a follow-up work to 'Astrodynes', which is focused more on calculation and general principles of usage.

5. Hadès (pseud.) 'Le Livre des Maisons Astrologiques' Éditions Bussière, Paris Ve, 1983. One of many works by this French author, who has been almost as prolific as André Barbault in his coverage of different astrological themes in book form. Hadès has a reputation within French circles of being a relative traditionalist (by late 20th century standards anyway), and of not trying to candy-coat his delineations of problematic astrological placements.

So, who's next? :-)
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Andrew Bevan



Joined: 20 Dec 2005
Posts: 4674
Location: Oslo, Norway

Posted: Mon Sep 13, 2010 11:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I couldn't match a booklist like that, but I don't mind saying that the first issue of 'The Horary Pracitioner' is always within reaching distance and in a plastic cover of its own. The first issue was published in April/May 1989, by Carol Wiggers and CJ Puotinen, includes a basic glossary and deals with the problem of 'Lost/mislaid objects and Missing people'. Simple and concise for anyone in a hurry - and quite frankly, whenever a question regarding lost articles arrives there are few places to hide for the practicing astrologer.

My shelves sort into 'topics' according to usefulness and importance. I have quite a bit of correspondance down through the years with interesting people from before the internet offered a more efficient and swift form of communication. The internet is probably likely to effect our historical files of the future, one way or the other. I fear that more is likely to get lost and deleted, rather than printed and put in a folder.

But anything lay on my desk is mostly for practical use, rather than for study. Several 'Ballentrae reprints' are easily located, including the work of Henry Coley if I wanted a second opinion or to expand on anything from Lilly. Ebertin on 'Fixed Stars' almost hops out of the shelf all on its own. I like Goldstein-Jacobsen's way of combinding the old and the new. Sibly and AlBiruni are available if there is something I want to look into, although Sibly is not a first choice. Simmonite frequently visits the desk, but mostly because of a useful overview on towns and nations.
_________________
http://www.astronor.com
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Steve



Joined: 16 Mar 2009
Posts: 261

Posted: Mon Sep 13, 2010 12:12 pm    Post subject: Reply to Philip Reply with quote

1: Interpreting Solar Returns, by James A. Eshelman

2: Solar and Lunar Returns, by Donald A. Bradley—Eshelman’s Mentor

3: The Combination Of Stellar Influences, by Reinhold Ebertin

4: Primer Of Sidereal Astrology, by Cyril Fagan & Brigadier R.C. Firebrace

5: Solunars Handbook—A collection of articles by Cyril Fagan selected by Joanne S. Clancy (Editor, American Astrology Magazine) after Fagan’s death in 1970.

*Dozens of American Astrology Magazines with articles by Western Siderealists—an invaluable source of learning for the astrologer including many other branches of astrology.

Steve
_________________
With all our modern knowledge and scientific equipment, and with the the great strides made in mathematics, we astrologers have done nothing to even remotely compare with the achievements of the astrologers of antiquity. Cyril Fagan
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
margherita



Joined: 10 Mar 2008
Posts: 1367
Location: Rome, Italy

Posted: Mon Sep 13, 2010 1:13 pm    Post subject: Re: Five Astrology books nearest your desk? (spot poll) Reply with quote

Philip Graves wrote:


2. Bini, Daniele et al., eds. 'Liber Physiognomiae der Biblioteca Estense Universitaria in Modena' - Libri Illustri Il Bilino, 2000. This consists of a full-colour facsimile of an old slightly illustrated Latin manuscript, complete with a replica working volvelle diagram, paired with a modern printed edition with facing German translation of the same work, in a cardboard slipcase




Worthy is worthy, but why they did not write how much is it? oops

margherita
_________________
Traditional astrology at
http://heavenastrolabe.wordpress.com
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
epurdue



Joined: 14 Nov 2007
Posts: 327

Posted: Mon Sep 13, 2010 2:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I actually have 12 books on my desk stacked on top of each other. The 5 on the top are Ben Dykes' Persian Nativities 1-3, Christian Astrology v. 3, and The Picatrix.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Astraea



Joined: 04 Oct 2004
Posts: 351
Location: Colorado, USA

Posted: Mon Sep 13, 2010 2:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nearest to my workspace are: Ben Dykes' two-volume translation of Bonatti, James Holden's translation of Morin's Book 21, a compendium of lectures by Rudolf Steiner called Astronomy and Astrology, and Lilly's Christian Astrology (Deb's annotated edition, which I was fortunate enough to purchase several years ago).
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
horarcek



Joined: 24 Jul 2005
Posts: 148
Location: Slovenia

Posted: Mon Sep 13, 2010 3:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

1. Christian Astrology I/II and III by Lilly
2. Houses by Deb Houlding
3. The Horary Textbook by J. Frawley
4. The Judgement of Nativities by Abu Ali
5. Bonatti: On Horary by B. Dykes

Trojan
_________________
Reges Subjucent Legibus Stellarum
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Deb
Administrator


Joined: 11 Oct 2003
Posts: 4130
Location: England

Posted: Mon Sep 13, 2010 4:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mithra6 wrote:
I actually have 12 books on my desk stacked on top of each other.


- if there was a competition for having the most books on a desk, or the most piles of books stacked open with sticky notes which can’t be closed because I’m referring to them all simultaneously (or will /might do shortly); or even the highest pile of books that are still upright and have not yet tumbled, I would win all three competitions at the moment. Laughing

This is not about favourites; so I am also going to list 5 books that are nearest to me right now.

Christian Astrology, William Lilly – (actually touching the keyboard and open at p.387 for a reference I wanted to give a student about how Lilly would identify and then use the ‘assisting planet’).

Moment of Astrology, Geoffrey Cornelius - I might be making a reference to one of GC’s points in a talk I am preparing, so I have the book on standby.

Urania’s Children, Ellic Howe – John Etherington was selling a 2nd hand copy of this at the recent Faculty Summer School. I have wanted it for a long time so it was bargain for only £12. Have only read the first few chapters so far but it is very good, and a nice, interesting easy read. Love Howe’s final words at the end of the first chapter - he's not quite sure about astrology but tries to be open-minded so concludes “astrology would be fine without the astrologers”.

Natural History, 3-7, Pliny – whilst looking up something else a few months ago, I noticed some other passages that looked really interesting with regard to synodic cycles, so I have a note telling myself to read it when I can find time (the note is getting quite dusty now …)

21st Century American Ephemeris – this doesn’t come down off the book shelf very often nowadays, but nothing beats an ephemeris for quick checks on when retrograde cycles start and finish.

PS - I am going to be offline for just over week now - Deb
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
margherita



Joined: 10 Mar 2008
Posts: 1367
Location: Rome, Italy

Posted: Mon Sep 13, 2010 6:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I want to say mine too Smile)

1. Tetrabiblos (Bezza translation)
2. William Liilly Christian Astrology III
3. Andrea Argoli. Ptolemaus Parvus
4. Albumasar. The book of revolutions of nativities (Ben Dykes)

margherita
_________________
Traditional astrology at
http://heavenastrolabe.wordpress.com
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Philip Graves



Joined: 07 Jan 2005
Posts: 436
Location: Europe

Posted: Mon Sep 13, 2010 6:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

What a lot of interesting responses, much as I had hoped, each throwing some light on the current studies or general technical leanings of the astrologer. Keep them coming, folks!

Margherita, I completely sympathise with your reaction in that I think the original price of the Liber Physiognomiae facsimile was prohibitive and excessive. I paid 3/11ths of that in an eBay auction for a copy with a slightly damaged slipcase (but all inside is fine). The remaining new stock has been knocked down to 4/11ths of the original price at Astronova.de too! Yes, it's still a lot.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Levente Laszlo



Joined: 03 Nov 2006
Posts: 190
Location: Budapest, Hungary

Posted: Mon Sep 13, 2010 8:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

What a good idea! Smile

Here's my list. I didn't always write editions as in some cases I've got more than one.

1. Yavanajataka ed. by Pingree
2. Antiochus of Athens: The Treasuries
3. Sahl ibn Bishr: Judgments according to the Twelve Houses of the Heavens (the first 3 treatises in Dykes' edition)
4. Ibn Abi al-Rijal: The Book of the Skilled
5. The Book of the Nine Judges

L.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Martin Gansten
Moderator


Joined: 05 Jul 2008
Posts: 1268
Location: Malmö, Sweden

Posted: Mon Sep 13, 2010 9:08 pm    Post subject: Re: Five Astrology books nearest your desk? (spot poll) Reply with quote

Can't resist this one. Very Happy Mine are:
1. E. S. Kennedy: Astronomy and Astrology in the Medieval Islamic World
2. D. Pingree: 'Classical and Byzantine Astrology in Sassanian Persia'
3. Nīlakaṇṭha Daivajña's Tājikanīlakaṇṭhī, with Viśvanātha's commentary
4. Balabhadra’s Hāyanaratna
5. Bram's translation of Firmicus' Mathesis
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Ed F



Joined: 22 Jan 2008
Posts: 301
Location: Ipswich, MA USA

Posted: Mon Sep 13, 2010 9:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Near the work desk:

ME Jones "Astrology - How and Why It Works". A piece of writing I can go back to decade after decade and get new insights from.

Margaret Millard "Genetics of Astrology". Application of the Topocentric system of Polich and Paige to family astrological relationships.

At least 7 shelves of additional stuff after that.

The downstairs desk:

Ben Dyke's Bonatti
Lee Lehman's Essential Dignities
Moment of Astrology
A couple of books on temperament
Curry's book on culture and astrology
Hand's Horoscope Symbols
a bunch of other stuff.

- Ed
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
astrojin



Joined: 15 Nov 2005
Posts: 466

Posted: Tue Sep 14, 2010 1:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hello,

As I am always on the move, I place all of my frequently referred to books not on my desk but in my car (I usually do my reading/work in the cafe).

1. All of Ben Dykes translated books viz Liber Astronomiae, Sahl & MAshaAllah and Persian Nativities.
2. Pingree's Dorotheus of Sidon's.
3. James Holden 2 books viz. Porphyry and Rhetorius
4. Ptolemy's, Valens', Firmicus' and Lilly's books (I have these in my labtop and kindle).

I also put other traditional/medieval books in my boot.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
handn



Joined: 02 Nov 2009
Posts: 509

Posted: Tue Sep 14, 2010 6:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I can see Lloyd Grossman noseying round your homes now....

"Now who would live in a house like this....."

Or, in Astrojin's case...

"Now who would drive a car like this...."

Very Happy

My nearest astrology books are William Lilly's, Ptolemy's Tetrabiblos, a couple of John Frawley's, and Barbara Dunn's Horary Astrology Textbook.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Forum Index -> News, Notices, Books, Links All times are GMT
Goto page 1, 2, 3, 4  Next
Page 1 of 4

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
. Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group

       
Contact Deborah Houlding  | terms and conditions  
All rights on all text and images reserved. Reproduction by any means is not permitted without the express
agreement of Deborah Houlding or in the case of articles by guest astrologers, the copyright owner indictated